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The Thomas T. Taber Museum of the Lycoming County Historical Society chronicles the history of our region from American Indian occupation through 20th century industry and life.

Flappers Rule the Night – For a Good Cause

CasinoEvil IIIt was a night of gaming, eating, drinking and fun - all to support the Lycoming County Historical Society and Preservation Williamsport. Casino Evil II brought scores of well dressed revelers who spent the night at the tables in search of gambler's luck - some had it - some did not. There were some wild accusations of cheating at one of the tables - all very exciting.

CasinoEvil IISuggesting the Prohibition Era of United States history, the venue recreated a Speakeasy of the 1920s. Guests came in costume of the period, with feathers, bow-ties and exotic dresses. The Speakeasy was equipped with an open bar and catered hors d’oeuvres. An oyster shuck-off contest, all kinds of gaming, and the opportunity to win some wonderful raffle prizes were the highlight of the evening.

Guy Graybill, who has written two books on Prince Farrington, was available to autograph books. Prince Farrington was known as a bootlegger during Prohibition, supplying the surrounding era with moonshine and other spirits produced in and around the County.

CasinoEvil IIAmong the great raffle prizes taken home by the successful gamblers were gold earrings crafted by Rick Mahonski, goldsmith, valued at $430; a Brooklyn Pizza/Coney Island Day Trip offered by AAA North Penn; a $125 gift certificate to Callahan’s Antiquities, Montoursville, two rounds of golf at White Deer Golf Course, a one night stay at the Genetti, stereoscopic views of British villages with an accompanying book from Otto’s Book Store, gift certificates to a number of fine restaurants and establishments, a  handcrafted necklace and earrings by glass artisan Deb Parsons, and Crosscutter tickets.

The well attended event was enjoyable - folks left with their gaming urges satisfied, their bellies full, prizes in their pockets and the satisfaction that their gaming losses were gains for historical preservation in Lycoming County.

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